Tag Archives: calicivirus

Feline Chlamydia

Both bacteria and viruses can cause conjunctivitis in cats. This condition is known as pink eye, the same thing that can affect dogs, humans, and other animals. Feline chlamydia results from a bacterial infection. Cats are usually infected with other viruses along with this disease like herpes virus and calicivirus.

Feline Chlamydia

Chlamydia in cats usually affects those at the younger or older end of the spectrum. Those with damaged immune systems or other illness of some sort have an increased risk too. However, the bacterial infection can cause symptoms in any cat.



There is an assortment of ways that feline chlamydia can be transmitted. The bacteria can be passed via eye discharge, nose secretions, or saliva from infected cats. Mothers are also capable of transmitting the disease to their kittens while giving birth.

You should also know that it’s possible chlamydia in cats to be transmitted in indirect ways. The bacteria can live in bedding, food dishes, and other places and can infect your cat if he comes into contact with them. Owners can also harbor the bacteria on their hands and pass it along to their felines.

Seeing the white of your cat’s eyes turn red is one of the primary signs of feline chlamydia. The eye may also swell, with the third eyelid closing partially. Discharge that’s very watery may also appear from the eyes. All of this will irritate your cat’s eye, causing him to paw at it frequently. This illness may only cause symptoms in one eye at first. Eventually though, both eyes will likely experience problems. As mentioned, chlamydia in cats usually occurs at the same time as other respiratory conditions. Cats may have a fever, discharge from the nose, coughing, and sneezing if this occurs.

Feline chlamydia doesn’t usually prove difficult to treat as long as it’s mild. Antibiotics can get rid of the bacteria. They may be given orally or placed directly in the affected eyes. The condition can get more problematic though if there are other problems at the same time. Your cat may have an upper respiratory illness that requires hospitalization.

Whenever giving your cat antibiotics to treat any condition, it’s vital to go through the entire regimen. If you don’t, then the bacteria you’re trying to get rid of may mutate and grow stronger. If this happens, they may become resistant to the antibiotics.

If you have multiple cats in your household, then you’ll especially need to be careful with feline chlamydia. It can easily be transmitted to other cats. Keep infected cats in seclusion. Disinfect bedding, food dishes, and other places that can harbor the bacteria. Also, make sure that you wash your hands thoroughly after you touch the infected cat so that you don’t spread it to your other felines.

Feline Panleukopenia

Feline panleukopenia, commonly referred to as distemper, is caused by a highly contagious virus. The disease, which can easily be fatal, destroys the white blood cells and damages the lining of the intestines and stomach. Since white blood cells help fight infections, this disease leaves your cat at risk for various other conditions.

Feline Panleukopenia

Transmission

The virus that causes panleukopenia in cats can be spread a variety of ways. Contact with infected cats, food dishes, bedding, and litter pans can spread the virus. Owners can also harbor the virus on their shoes, clothes, and hands and give it to their cat. Fleas can also transmit the disease.



Signs

Feline panleukopenia causes symptoms to appear after an incubation period of about five days. Cats experience diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite and thirst, and abdominal pain. Your cat may also stop grooming himself properly and develop a rough coat. The “third eyelid” may also appear in the inner corner of the eye.

Diagnosis

Different diseases share some of the same signs as those caused by panleukopenia in cats. The vet will review your cat’s medical history and symptoms. A blood test to check for antibodies to the virus will help confirm that your cat has this disease.

Treatment

Feline panleukopenia causes frequent diarrhea and vomiting which can lead to dehydration. Therefore, treatment will likely involve fluid therapy to prevent this and to help stop the diarrhea and vomiting. Secondary bacterial infections will also need to be prevented until the immune system can hopefully take over.

Prevention

There is a vaccine available to help prevent panleukopenia in cats. It is usually combined with shots to protect against calicivirus and herpes virus. Your cat will need to have booster shots every one to three years.

Feline Pancreatitis

Feline pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is tasked with production of digestive enzymes and hormones to regulate blood sugar. The condition can be either acute or chronic. Acute cases occur suddenly and unexpectedly, while chronic progresses over time.

Feline Pancreatitis

Causes

There are many different causes of pancreatitis in cats. Some of the most common include injuries, poor diet, and various infections. Cats can also have an adverse reaction to various medications or anesthesia and develop the condition. Diseases that affect the small intestine or bile duct can also cause cat pancreatitis. Other offending infections include toxoplasmosis and feline calicivirus.



Signs

The most common signs of feline pancreatitis include loss of appetite, dehydration, and lethargy. If the disease is allowed to progress, your cat may start to lose weight or have trouble moving around. Severe cases that are left untreated can also be fatal.

Diagnosis

Pancreatitis in cats can be difficult to diagnose correctly since cats can produce various symptoms. An ultrasound and x-ray can help determine if there is any abnormality in the pancreas. The vet will also need to perform a physical exam, medical history, and a blood test to check for pancreatic enzyme levels.

Treatment

Once diagnosed, feline pancreatitis is treated via supportive care. Cats can easily experience imbalanced electrolytes and dehydration. Therefore, your cat may need to be given fluids intravenously or subcutaneously. If secondary infections occur, they will need to be treated with antibiotics.

Prognosis

The prognosis of pancreatitis in cats is generally good if the case is only mild. However, sometimes the condition recurs more severely after an apparent successful treatment. Also, cats suffering from other conditions have a worse prognosis. Other conditions that can cause problems include diabetes mellitus or diseases that affect the small intestine or liver.

Feline Calicivirus

Feline calicivirus is also known as FCV. This disease is brought on by a viral infection and usually causes mild flu-like symptoms which rarely cause serious problems. Most cats are vaccinated against this illness, but the virus that causes it is still prevalent.

Feline Calicivirus

Cause

Calicivirus in felines is caused by a virus spread through contact with eye discharge, nose discharge, and saliva. Some cats are even infected through contact with feces. Cats infected with the virus can spread it to other cats even if they shown no symptoms of illness themselves.



Signs

Different strains can lead to this disease, so cat calicivirus can produce various symptoms. They commonly include upper respiratory signs such as discharge from the eyes and nose. Other signs include fever, loss of appetite, pneumonia, and difficulty breathing. Some cats even develop sores in their mouth or on their paws.

Diagnosis

Calicivirus in cats causes some of the same signs as other upper respiratory infections. The veterinarian will review your feline’s medical history and take note of his symptoms. Laboratory tests can confirm if calicivirus is the cause of the illness.

Treatment

Feline calicivirus is treated by letting it run its course. You will need to provide your cat with plenty of fluids and food. If he has developed mouth sores, it’s best to give him soft foods. You will also need to clean discharge away from the eyes and nose.

Cat calicivirus can also lead to pneumonia and severe cases may require oxygen therapy. Antibiotics can treat or prevent secondary infections, while eye drops help clear eye discharge.

Prevention

The virus that causes feline calicivirus can be found in food dishes, litter boxes, and clothing. It can survive in the environment up to ten days. To make matters worse, it is resistance to many household disinfectants. It is important to get your cat vaccinated.