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Feline Conjunctivitis

It is quite common for cats to develop conjunctivitis. The conjunctiva is the membrane that lines the eyelids and encompasses a portion of the eyeball surface. The condition develops whenever it becomes inflamed.

Feline Conjunctivitis

It is important to get this inflammation treated as soon as possible. Failure to do so could open the door to more serious eye problems developing. Corneal ulcers can easily develop due to serious inflammation.



Causes

Conjunctivitis in cats can occur for a wide range of reasons. Fungal, bacterial, and viral infections are commonly the underlying reason that the problem occurs. The condition is also a side effect of diseases like immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus, and chlamydia. Also, the conjunctiva can become inflamed because of allergens like pollen.

Signs

Fortunately, owners have no trouble spotting signs of cat conjunctivitis. The affected eye will turn noticeably red. One or both may be affected. The red color is caused by the presence of blood vessels and the build up of fluid in the area.

Another common sign of inflammation is discharge from the eye. The particular color will vary anywhere from clear to greenish yellow. The eye will be very irritating, causing cats to paw in an effort to get relief. It’s also common for the eye to swell, especially if it’s continuously pawed at.

Diagnosis

To diagnose feline conjunctivitis is a relatively straightforward process. The vet will simply take a culture of the eye discharge. This will provide him with information as to the underlying cause, whether it be fungal, bacterial, etc.

Treatment

Cats that are suffering from conjunctivitis are usually provided relief in the form of eye ointment or drops. These will have to be applied multiple times throughout the day, the frequency of which will be determined by the specific medication. Allergic reactions can be treated with anti-inflammatory eye drops.

The eye’s red color should diminish within just a few days of your cat receiving the ointment or drops. However, it’s important that you continue applying them for the prescribed length of time even if the symptoms have disappeared. If you discontinue treatment early, the condition may not be fully treated.

As you have already learned, the herpes virus can also lead to signs of this condition. In these particular cases, the symptoms of feline conjunctivitis may disappear for a while, but will more than likely recur at some point.

Feline Rhinotracheitis

The herpes virus causes many problems for your cat, with one of them being the development of rhinotracheitis. This condition mainly causes upper respiratory infections in your cat, and can also lead to eye problems like conjunctivitis.

Feline Rhinotracheitis

Feline rhinotracheitis is mainly a problem for young kittens. However, young ones can harbor the virus for years without showing an outward signs in the meantime. Cats that are infected with the leukemia or immunodeficiency viruses have a major risk of being infected with this one. If your cat frequently displays signs of this condition, then it may be a sign that something more serious is wrong.



The virus that causes rhinotracheitis in cats doesn’t prompt symptoms right away. The incubation period, the time in which cats don’t display signs, typically lasts for a few days up to a couple of weeks. This can prove problematic for households with multiple cats, since felines can infect others despite not showing signs themselves.

The signs of feline rhinotracheitis are quite similar to those of other upper respiratory infections. Cats will start coughing, sneezing, and producing discharge from their nose. The nasal lining and the eyelid lining may also become inflamed. The former is referred to as rhinitis, while the later is called conjunctivitis.

Cats commonly have a fever while battling this condition too. Others will lose their appetite until they start feeling a little better. Rhinotracheitis in felines can cause cats to display just a few of these symptoms or all of them at once.

There isn’t an exact testing method to diagnose feline rhinotracheitis. Your vet will simply need to look at the signs that your cat is displaying while taking his medical history into account. It isn’t always easy to identify this condition accurately.

Even if rhinotracheitis in cats were diagnosed, there is no way for vets to treat your cat. The disease usually runs its course after a week or so. In the meantime, supportive measures can be provided for your pet.

Since cats with rhinotracheitis have nasal discharge that can make it difficult to breathe, nasal decongestants are usually provided. Keeping your cat in a room with a humidifier or vaporizer going will also help him breathe better. Owners need to wipe away secretions from the eyes and nose to help minimize the risk of their cats getting reinfected.

Once feline rhinotracheitis compromises the immune system, secondary bacterial infections can easily set in. Your cat may need to take antibiotics to keep these infections from causing additional problems.

This condition is highly contagious. If you have one cat that has been infected, it’s best to keep him away from other felines for a while. If not, you will likely be dealing with multiple sick cats at once.

There is a vaccine to protect against feline rhinotracheitis. However, it doesn’t always keep cats from being infected entirely. Those that have been vaccinated though likely won’t experience serious stages of the disease.

Feline Aids

Aids in cats is commonly referred to as HIV or immunodeficiency virus. Whatever it’s called, the disease is one of the most serious since cats die from it. Infected cats spread feline aids through their saliva whenever they bite another cat. Although it’s very rare, a mother may also pass the disease to her kittens during birth.

Feline Aids

Feline aids, or the immunodeficiency virus, wreaks havoc on your cat’s immune system. The virus will render the system ineffective, so your cat will have an increased risk of developing various other diseases.



It can be quite difficult to spot the signs of aids in cats in the initial stages. For one, felines are very capable of hiding illness from potential predators and owners alike. Also, cats infected with the virus may not show symptoms for several years after being infected. Lethargy and appetite loss are two of the most common signs of the initial stages of feline aids. Cats may also develop diarrhea or fevers. The lymph nodes may also start swelling up.

Once feline HIV progresses though, symptoms will appear more serious. Cats start losing weight. Sores and lesions can also appear around the eyes and mouth. Since their immune system is compromised, cats will also suffer chronic infections. The leukemia virus commonly infects cats concurrently with HIV.

The first step in diagnosing aids in cats involves taking a complete medical history. Since cats that are allowed to roam outside frequently have a higher risk, the vet will also ask about your pet’s environment. A blood test is necessary in order to diagnose feline aids. It’s not possible to detect the virus in the blood. However, the body makes antibodies in an attempt to battle the virus, and these antibodies can be detected.

Just because the test for feline HIV comes back positive doesn’t always mean that your cat is infected. False positives can occur for a few reasons. The main way is if your cat has ever been vaccinated for the illness. If the mother passes antibodies to her kittens via the milk, then they may test positive also despite the fact that they’re aren’t infected with the virus.

Just like with the disease that affects humans, there is no treatment for feline aids. Cats can live for quite a few years without showing any symptoms of illness at all. The fortunate ones can live for a decade or so without experiencing problems. Once symptoms appear though, supportive care will eventually become necessary.

There is a vaccination for aids in cats, so it’s best that owners take advantage of it. Since getting into fights with stray cats is a primary transmission method, you should also do your best to limit the amount of roaming that your cat does.

Feline Anemia

Blood is made up of various types of cells, with red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen. Without enough of these cells circulating throughout the body, oxygen won’t make its way to various areas. This is known as feline anemia, and it is an important sign that some underlying disease or condition is affecting your cat.

Feline Anemia

Anemia in cats can occur if red blood cells are being destroyed faster than they’re being produced. The bone marrow may not even be producing them in the first place for some reason. Trauma that results in a lot of blood loss will also bring it about.



Feline anemia also occurs when your cat has leukemia or the immunodeficiency virus. Other diseases like cancer and chronic kidney failure may also be responsible.

The signs of anemia in cats are quite easy to spot if you’re a vigilant owner. The mucous membranes will lose their color. You’ll see the gums turn pale. Cats will also lose their appetite, lose weight, and appear lethargic. The stool may also appear blacker than normal.

If you bring your cat in with signs of feline anemia, the veterinarian will need to conduct a battery of tests since there are so many things that can cause it. A complete blood count will be quite useful to see the makeup of the blood exactly. Tests can also be conducted to check for blood parasites, while a stool sample can determine if gastrointestinal problems are causing issues.

As you should already know, the bone marrow is responsible for producing red blood cells. A biopsy will help see if it’s doing the job properly still. Finding the root cause of anemia in cats is very important so that it can be treated.

Cats that are losing blood may need a blood transfusion. Kidney failure can cause feline anemia since the kidneys produce a hormone that tells bone marrow to produce more red blood cells. Cats may benefit from being given synthetic hormones.

If there are large amounts of worms or fleas infesting your cat, then they will need to be dealt with accordingly. Yet another possible course of treatment includes using antibiotics to get rid of anything that may be infecting your cat besides viruses.

Feline anemia also occurs because of cancer, so chemotherapy may be your cat’s best option. Supportive care may only be possible if leukemia or immunodeficiency viruses are the cause.

Feline Diarrhea

Diarrhea in cats is not a disease, but merely a symptom of an underlying disease. You should be aware that persistent diarrhea can cause severe dehydration. Dehydration will rob your cat of essential fluids and nutrients which can prove to be fatal if not treated in time.

Feline Diarrhea

Causes

There are numerous things that can cause feline diarrhea. Cats who consume something they’re not supposed to may develop the condition. Viruses or parasites that affect the intestinal tract or stomach can also cause diarrhea. There are plenty of diseases that can cause it as well. Some of the most common include hyperthyroidism, leukemia virus, inflammatory bowel disease, and immunodeficiency virus.

Signs

Cats who experience a mild case of diarrhea will likely just have loose stool. However, major diseases that cause the condition may lead to other symptoms such as vomiting, appetite loss, fever, and lethargy. The stool may also be bloody. Some cats also experience abdominal pain and the aforementioned dehydration.

Diagnosis

It is important for the vet to determine what is causing the case of feline diarrhea. This is done by taking a complete medical history and performing a thorough physical examination. The vet will also have the stool checked for the presence of bacteria or parasites.

Treatment

Once the veterinarian has determined what is causing the condition, he can begin treatment accordingly. Electrolytes and fluids will need to be replaced in the event of dehydration. Antibiotics or other special medications may need to be prescribed to treat the underlying disease. Some cats may need a change in diet or even surgery to correct the problem.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline infectious peritonitis is a viral disease that is mostly always fatal. The conditions develop gradually over time, so the condition is usually advanced before signs are noticeable. There are two forms of the disease, namely wet and dry. Here is everything you need to know about this health condition.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Causes

Younger and older cats are more at risk for developing infectious peritonitis. This is due to their undeveloped or weakened immune systems. Cats under a lot of stress or that have a poor diet are also at risk of being infected by the virus. Cats with other diseases such as the immunodeficiency virus or leukemia virus also have an increased risk.

Signs

Cats that develop the wet form of infectious peritonitis experience fluid buildup. If fluid accumulates in the chest cavity, the lungs may become compressed. This will lead to difficulty breathing. Fluid can also build up in the abdominal cavity and cause swelling.

Fluid buildup isn’t really a problem with the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis. This form causes symptoms such as paralysis, seizures, and eye inflammation. It may also lead to weight loss, anemia, fever, depression, and pancreatic disease.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing feline infectious peritonitis is quite difficult. Infected cats will have a large number of coronavirus antibodies. However, a large number of these antibodies can also simply mean the cat was exposed to the virus in the past. A biopsy of affected tissue can yield a more definitive diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment of infectious peritonitis in cats is non-existent. It usually proves to be a fatal condition. Treatment involves supportive care and alleviating any inflammation that occurs. This includes fluids, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and fluid draining.