Tag Archives: infectious peritonitis

Feline Pneumonia

If it isn’t treated, feline pneumonia can turn into a serious problem. It occurs when the lungs become inflamed due to a foreign substance or organism of some sort. When inflamed, the lungs won’t be able to perform properly which causes breathing difficulty. Fortunately, this condition doesn’t affect cats frequently.

Feline Pneumonia

Cause

Pneumonia in cats usually occurs whenever they’re suffering from another condition that affects the respiratory system. The weakened immune system leaves them susceptible. Invasion of organisms like fungi, viruses, or bacteria can also lead to this respiratory illness. Cats that inhale water, vomit, or another type of substance that can irritate that lungs are also at risk.



Signs

The most noticeable sign of cat pneumonia is breathing difficulty. You may notice respiratory sounds being louder than normal. If only a small portion of the lungs are inflamed, signs won’t be as bad. Symptoms will become more severe as a larger portion of the lungs become affected. Other signs include nasal discharge, coughing, and fever. It is also common for felines to lose their appetite somewhat.

Diagnosis

Like with most conditions, the vet will start out reviewing your pet’s medical history and performing a physical examination. He will pay special attention to the chest if feline pneumonia is suspected. Using a stethoscope, he’ll be able to hear if there are any breathing problems.

In order to get a definitive diagnosis though, an x-ray of the chest may need to be done. As mentioned, various organizations can cause pneumonia in cats. It’s necessary to identify the specific one that’s causing the condition if a foreign substance isn’t to blame.

Treatment

If an invading organism can be identified to be the cause of the illness, the appropriate medication will be prescribed. This is only effective if the organism is bacterial. In some cases, cats will need to undergo surgery to correct the problem.

Pneumonia in felines causes respiratory distress, the severity of which varies. If the distress is severe, your cat may need to receive oxygen therapy. Intravenous fluids can be helpful if dehydration is a concern.

Prognosis

Most cats are able to recover from this condition if they are otherwise healthy. Other conditions that cause pneumonia to develop on a secondary basis may lower the prognosis. Infectious peritonitis is a disease that can lead to cat pneumonia, and it is generally fatal, especially for young or old cats.

Feline Kidney Failure

The kidneys are responsible for removing waste products, maintaining water levels, and other significant functions. Feline kidney failure can be termed acute or chronic. Acute occurs when kidney function stops suddenly, while chronic occurs progressively over time.

Feline Kidney Failure

Causes

Feline kidney failure can occur for numerous reasons. Physical damage or bacterial infection of the kidneys can cause the condition. Cats who consume antifreeze or other poisons may develop kidney failure too. Some underlying diseases such as feline infectious peritonitis also increase the risk.



Symptoms

The kidneys have a large reserve capacity, so your feline won’t show symptoms until the condition has advanced. Once it does, symptoms of kidney failure in cats include decreased appetite, weight loss, vomiting, and a poor coat. Other signs include pale mucous membranes, bad breath, lethargy, and increased thirst and urination.

Diagnosis

Feline kidney failure can be diagnosed in a variety of ways. The vet will palpate the abdomen to check for a change in the shape and size of the kidneys since they may be either shrunken or enlarged. Blood tests can also be performed to check for waste products of protein processing called urea.

Because the kidneys won’t be functioning as normal to get rid of wastes, urea levels will be elevated. Other tests to diagnose kidney failure include x-rays, ultrasounds, and urinalysis.

Treatment

If your cat is diagnosed with kidney failure, he will likely need fluid therapy to prevent dehydration. This also helps to remove accumulated toxins in the bloodstream. These fluids are typically administered intravenously, so your cat will need to be hospitalized.

Symptoms such as lack of appetite and vomiting can be controlled through the use of medications. Cats that experience anemia may be given medications or blood transfusions. You will also need to provide your cat with plenty of fresh water to drink at home. It’s also important that you limit the amount of stress he experiences.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline infectious peritonitis is a viral disease that is mostly always fatal. The conditions develop gradually over time, so the condition is usually advanced before signs are noticeable. There are two forms of the disease, namely wet and dry. Here is everything you need to know about this health condition.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Causes



Younger and older cats are more at risk for developing infectious peritonitis. This is due to their undeveloped or weakened immune systems. Cats under a lot of stress or that have a poor diet are also at risk of being infected by the virus. Cats with other diseases such as the immunodeficiency virus or leukemia virus also have an increased risk.

Signs

Cats that develop the wet form of infectious peritonitis experience fluid buildup. If fluid accumulates in the chest cavity, the lungs may become compressed. This will lead to difficulty breathing. Fluid can also build up in the abdominal cavity and cause swelling.

Fluid buildup isn’t really a problem with the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis. This form causes symptoms such as paralysis, seizures, and eye inflammation. It may also lead to weight loss, anemia, fever, depression, and pancreatic disease.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing feline infectious peritonitis is quite difficult. Infected cats will have a large number of coronavirus antibodies. However, a large number of these antibodies can also simply mean the cat was exposed to the virus in the past. A biopsy of affected tissue can yield a more definitive diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment of infectious peritonitis in cats is non-existent. It usually proves to be a fatal condition. Treatment involves supportive care and alleviating any inflammation that occurs. This includes fluids, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and fluid draining.